Rhodolith/Maërl Beds: A Global Perspective pp 319-333

Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 15) | Cite as

Eastern Pacific

  • Néstor M. Robinson
  • Cindy Fernández-García
  • Rafael Riosmena-Rodríguez
  • Edgar F. Rosas-Alquicira
  • Brenda Konar
  • Heloise Chenelot
  • Stephen C. Jewett
  • Roland R. Melzer
  • Roland Meyer
  • Günter Försterra
  • Vreni Häussermann
  • Erasmo C. Macaya
Chapter

Abstract

In the Eastern Pacific (EP) the only region where rhodolith beds have been well studied in terms of taxonomy, ecology, distribution and conservation status is the Gulf of California. Outside this region the knowledge of rhodolith-forming species is attributed to the initial separate floristic surveys of Dawson and Lemoine, performed more than 50 years ago. After a detailed review of the published literature and information produced during our expeditions throughout the EP, a total of 36 rhodolith-forming species have been recorded from the Aleutian Islands in Alaska to Guarello Island in Chile. Despite the research efforts developed at present, more species remain to be discovered in the EP, particularly in the Tropical Pacific of Mexico and the Pacific coast of Baja California where we found undescribed species of Sporolithon and Lithothamnion. Therefore, we contend that further studies are needed in order to better catalogue the wide rhodolith-forming species diversity that is extremely relevant for the marine realm of the EP.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Néstor M. Robinson
    • 1
  • Cindy Fernández-García
    • 2
  • Rafael Riosmena-Rodríguez
    • 1
  • Edgar F. Rosas-Alquicira
    • 3
  • Brenda Konar
    • 4
  • Heloise Chenelot
    • 4
  • Stephen C. Jewett
    • 4
  • Roland R. Melzer
    • 5
  • Roland Meyer
    • 5
  • Günter Försterra
    • 6
  • Vreni Häussermann
    • 6
  • Erasmo C. Macaya
    • 7
  1. 1.Departamento de Biología MarinaUniversidad de Baja California SurLa PazMexico
  2. 2.Escuela de Biología, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (CIMAR)Universidad de Costa RicaSan PedroCosta Rica
  3. 3.Instituto de RecursosUniversidad del Mar (UMAR), Ciudad Universitary s/nPuerto ÁngelMexico
  4. 4.School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Institute of Marine ScienceUniversity of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA
  5. 5.Zoologische Staatssammlung MünchenMunichGermany
  6. 6.Huinay Scientific Field Station, Puerto Montt, and, Escuela de Ciencias del Mar, Facultad de Recursos NaturalesPontificia Universidad Católica de ValparaísoValparaísoChile
  7. 7.Laboratorio de Estudios Algales ALGALAB, Departamento de Oceanografía, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y OceanográficasUniversidad de ConcepciónConcepciónChile

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