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To Reveal Is to Critique: Actor-Network Theory and Critical Information Systems Research

  • Bill Doolin
  • Alan Lowe

Abstract

This paper examines some of the issues for critical researchers of information systems (IS) arising from the post-modern turn (Lyotard, 1984; Seidman, 1994). The emphasis of the paper is to explore the increased interest and significance of research styles that have been developed within this genre and their application to IS research. The paper will approach this issue by giving particular attention to an examination of the relevance of research informed from an actor-network theory perspective. We see actor-network theory as an important addition to a broader critical research project (Alvesson and Deetz, 2000).

Keywords

Network Theory Critical Theory Critical Research Information System Research Electronic Data Interchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Information Technology Trust 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bill Doolin
    • 1
  • Alan Lowe
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Waikato Management SchoolHamiltonNew Zealand

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