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History and IS — Broadening Our View and Understanding: Actor-Network Theory as a Methodology

  • William Bill Bonner

Abstract

The call for a historic turn in IS studies is mirrored in business studies generally and is the explicit recognition of the predominance of presentism and universalism in research. It is an implicit but unstated assumption that the present is the product of an extended, unproblematic and universally shared past (Booth and Rowlinson, 2006). ‘Presentism results in research being reported as if it occurred in a decontextualized extended present’ (Booth and Rowlinson, 2006: 6). This critical assumption centers the present as if it were a stable entity stripped of its messiness and uncertainty leading to the observation that, ‘Most of our mainstream journals [organizational studies, in this case] are written as if they apply to some disembodied abstract realm’ (Zald, 1996: 256).

Keywords

Motor Vehicle Personal Data Magnetic Tape License Plate Auditor General 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Information Technology Trust 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Bill Bonner
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Business AdministrationUniversity of ReginaReginaCanada

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