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Psychosexual Issues and Quality of Life after Oncologic Pelvic Surgery, with Focus on Cervical Cancer

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Functional Urologic Surgery in Neurogenic and Oncologic Diseases

Abstract

The extraordinary progress in oncologic surgery has blessed patients with a “second life.” The minimally invasive surgery has the ambitious goal of maximizing the benefits in terms of health expectancy, a challenge far beyond the goal of increasing life expectancy.

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Graziottin, A., Lukasiewicz, M. (2016). Psychosexual Issues and Quality of Life after Oncologic Pelvic Surgery, with Focus on Cervical Cancer. In: Carbone, A., Palleschi, G., Pastore, A., Messas, A. (eds) Functional Urologic Surgery in Neurogenic and Oncologic Diseases. Urodynamics, Neurourology and Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29191-8_9

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