Software Engineering Education Going Agile pp 123-128

Part of the Progress in IS book series (PROIS)

Principled Flipped Learning Paradigm for Laboratory Courses in Software Engineering

  • Tonghua Su
  • Shengchun Deng
  • Xiaofei Xu
  • Dong Li
  • Zhiying Tu
Chapter

Abstract

Laboratory courses in software engineering are more problem solving oriented than regular courses, thus flipped learning seems to be an effective teaching approach. We present a principled flipped learning paradigm for laboratory course in software engineering to enable student-centered learning. The paradigm consists of three instruction models: the goal-assessment model, the process model, and the course evolutionary model. The goal-assessment model is used to guide and assure the success of the course, following a divide-then-conquer strategy. The process model breakdowns the learning life cycle and arranges them as a spiral process. Finally, the course evolutionary model connects the aforementioned two models together: if there is any unsatisfied subgoal, then the course process model will be renewed in the next cycle or semester. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed paradigm, we also present our practices in a case study.

Keywords

Flipped Classroom Education Model Student-centered Teaching Software Engineering Education Laboratory Course 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tonghua Su
    • 1
  • Shengchun Deng
    • 1
  • Xiaofei Xu
    • 1
  • Dong Li
    • 1
  • Zhiying Tu
    • 1
  1. 1.School of SoftwareHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinChina

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