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Conclusions

  • Christopher R. BowenEmail author
  • Vitaly Yu. Topolov
  • Hyunsun Alicia Kim
Chapter
  • 1.3k Downloads
Part of the Springer Series in Materials Science book series (SSMATERIALS, volume 238)

Abstract

The present monograph has been devoted to the performance of modern piezoelectric materials that can be applied as active elements of energy-harvesting devices or systems. In the last decade piezoelectric materials (mainly poled FCs and piezo-active composites based on either FCs or relaxor-ferroelectric SCs) have been the focus of many studies on energy-harvesting characteristics.

Keywords

Active Element Piezoelectric Material Ferroelectric Material Electromechanical Property Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher R. Bowen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Vitaly Yu. Topolov
    • 2
  • Hyunsun Alicia Kim
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Research CentreUniversity of BathBathUK
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsSouthern Federal UniversityRostov-on-DonRussia
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of BathBathUK
  4. 4.Structural Engineering DepartmentUniversity of California San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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