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Conceptions, Purposes and Processes of Ongoing Learning across Working Life

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Part of the Professional and Practice-based Learning book series (PPBL,volume 16)

Abstract

There is a growing need for a comprehensive and informed account of how learning across working life can be conceptualised, its range of purposes outlined, and processes supporting that learning understood. Consensus exists across governments and supra-national agencies, spokespersons for industry, occupations, employees, workplaces, education systems and communities and by workers themselves that the ongoing development of occupational capacities is now required by all kinds of workers in all occupations across their working lives. This consensus arises from the recognition that not only is the knowledge required for occupational practice subject to constant change, but also the nature and form of that change are more than merely keeping up-to-date with the latest developments. Instead, many occupations are being transformed, which affects what constitutes occupational competence and extends to what is expected of those occupations by the community. Moreover, the nature and kinds of paid employment, how it is undertaken and by whom are also constantly changing. Therefore, there is a need to view workers’ ongoing development across working lives as a major education project. Given the importance of this project in securing economic and social goals, it warrants a fresh and informed approach to how these goals might be realised. The focus here is distinct from other educational projects in so far as its conceptions are far broader. The concern is to build upon both work and educational experiences, and to be open to a range of provisions of experiences and support going beyond the scope of what can be realised through the provision of experiences in educational institutions. So, this project needs to be realised not only through educational systems and institutions, but also in the circumstances where occupations are enacted (i.e., workplaces, work practices and communities). Given this necessity for ongoing learning across working life constitutes an entire educational project, there needs to be clarity about what conceptions underpin it, the kind of purposes to which it is directed and the processes used to realise these purposes. In this way, this concluding chapter draws upon contributions within this book and those from elsewhere to set out something of what comprises the educational project associated with ongoing learning across working life.

Keywords

  • Professional Development
  • Work Practice
  • Junior Doctor
  • Ongoing Development
  • Personal Project

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Billett, S., Dymock, D., Choy, S. (2016). Conceptions, Purposes and Processes of Ongoing Learning across Working Life. In: Billett, S., Dymock, D., Choy, S. (eds) Supporting Learning Across Working Life. Professional and Practice-based Learning, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29019-5_15

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29019-5_15

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