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STUDIO: Ontology-Centric Knowledge-Based System

Part of the Knowledge Management and Organizational Learning book series (IAKM,volume 2)

Abstract

Characterizing, structuring and systematizing all the knowledge assets of an organization represents a major challenge nowadays. At the same time rapid social, economic and technological changes require organizations to act and adapt quickly. In order to be able to meet all these expectations, organizations must implement such comprehensive knowledge management solutions that enable multiple ways of using and reusing organizational knowledge. This chapter provides a complete description of how the STUDIO knowledge-based system can support organizations in applying and evaluating knowledge, in learning, in adapting changes to their own context quickly, and in translating learning into action. STUDIO is an extensible and domain independent knowledge based system that captures the relevant domain concepts and their relations by ontological entities around which a set of knowledge—and human resource management related tasks are carried out. To evaluate the proposed architecture we have applied it to the challenge of managing knowledge both in business and educational contexts.

Keywords

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In later versions of their book they have used the expression “knowledge management system” instead of “knowledge-based system”.

  2. 2.

    In other words the ontology is specified.

  3. 3.

    www.commonkads.org.

  4. 4.

    https://semantic-mediawiki.org/.

  5. 5.

    A testlet is a cluster of test items that share a common path, scenario, or other context.

  6. 6.

    The examinee can set a threshold according to the objectives of the test to be taken. The selected threshold is automatically applied by the test evaluation algorithm.

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Correspondence to Réka Vas .

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Vas, R. (2016). STUDIO: Ontology-Centric Knowledge-Based System. In: Gábor, A., Kő, A. (eds) Corporate Knowledge Discovery and Organizational Learning. Knowledge Management and Organizational Learning, vol 2. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28917-5_4

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