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Water Footprint of Bottled Drinks and Food Security

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Water, Food and Welfare

Abstract

This chapter raises the incongruity between the dynamism of the bottled drinks sector and shortages, quality, and water management in Mexico. The study questions the importance of the bottling sector and the consumption pattern of its products, and it approaches the virtual water content of the products of this industry based on Hoekstra (2010) and Garrido (2010), so that their magnitudes can be compared.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Acronym for Polyethylene Terephthalate.

  2. 2.

    This approach does not match the information from the National Water Commission.

  3. 3.

    In 2008, Coca Cola updated the risk for its activities and a requirement for the entire system, which came into force in its bottling plants, was the evaluation of local water resources sustainability used to produce its beverages as well as the sustainability of the available water resources used in the surrounding communities. These assessments include vulnerability, quality and quantity of local water resources (Coca Cola 2010).

  4. 4.

    Coca Cola uses 153.1 billion liters (km3) of surface water and groundwater, 139.2 km3 of municipal water, and 2.2 km3 of rainwater and other sources to prepare its drinks. The Coca-Cola Company, Sustainability Report Section from 2010/2011.

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Correspondence to Roberto M. Constantino-Toto .

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Constantino-Toto, R.M., Montero, D. (2016). Water Footprint of Bottled Drinks and Food Security. In: Pérez-Espejo, R., Constantino-Toto, R., Dávila-Ibáñez, H. (eds) Water, Food and Welfare. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol 23. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28824-6_20

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