Flow Within Everyday Emotions and Motivations: A Reversal Theory Perspective

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces reversal theory in relation to flow theory and explains why it could be helpful in exploring flow within everyday emotions and motivations. Reversal theory itself is described and the methods by which people are thought to move between metamotivational states are explained. It is argued that flow and reversal theory have similarities, but differ in how they propose people enter and leave optimal states and in the number and type of optimal state that are thought to be part of human experience. Reversal theory’s emphasis on the dynamic nature of people’s emotions and motivations, combined with the suggestion that there are eight different types of optimal state, appear compatible with findings from phenomenological research that explored the flow process. The rationale for undertaking phenomenological research exploring the flow process will be provided. The methodology of phenomenology will be justified and explored and clarification given to the method used within these phenomenological studies.

Keywords

Flow Reversal theory Emotion Motivation Phenomenology 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Health SciencesUniversity of BrightonEastbourneUK

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