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Introduction: Does Social Morphogenesis Threaten the Rule of Law?

  • Margaret S. ArcherEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Social Morphogenesis book series (SOCMOR)

Abstract

Does intense social change (morphogenesis) and the lack of a stable social context spell a crisis for both normative consensus and legal regulation of the social order? In other words, does the valid and effective rule of law depend upon morphostasis in society? Traditionally, normativity, social integration and legal regulation were held to be mutually reinforcing, but this mutual support has weakened greatly over the last three decades as morphogenesis has increased and morphostasis declined. Contributors explore the consequences of three processes:
  • That plurality rather than universality characterizes normativity almost everywhere

  • That the increase and greater accessibility of cultural ‘variety’ (new ideas, new modes of communication) serves to decrease uniformity in any social area and thus to reduce social integration

  • That consequently social regulation is now most concerned with co-ordination and fosters cooperation and redistribution only insofar as these are necessary for co-ordinating social activities and sectors

Keywords

Legal philosophy Sociology of law Social change Cultural variety Social integration 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Social OntologyUniversity of WarwickCoventryUK

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