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Neuroelectrical Indexes for the Study of the Efficacy of TV Advertising Stimuli

  • Patrizia Cherubino
  • Arianna Trettel
  • Giulia Cartocci
  • Dario Rossi
  • Enrica Modica
  • Anton Giulio Maglione
  • Marco Mancini
  • Gianluca di Flumeri
  • Fabio Babiloni
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

In this chapter, we present the findings of an experiment aimed to investigate cognitive and emotional changes of cerebral activity during the observation of TV commercials. In particular, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) from a group of 24 healthy subjects during the observation of a series of TV advertisements. The group was equally divided also by gender (male, female) and age (young, old). Comparisons of cerebral and emotional indices previously defined have been performed to highlight gender differences between TV commercial and scenes of interest of specific commercials. Findings show how EEG methodologies, along with the measurements of autonomic variables, could be used to obtain information not obtainable otherwise with verbal interviews. These cerebral and emotional indexes could help to analyze the perception of TV advertisements according to the consumer’s gender and age.

Keywords

EEG HR GSR TV commercials Neuromarketing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The grants provided to Fabio Babiloni by the Italian Ministry of University and Education under the PRIN 2012 and that provided by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the bilateral relation between Italy and China for the project “Neuropredictor” are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrizia Cherubino
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Arianna Trettel
    • 2
  • Giulia Cartocci
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dario Rossi
    • 2
    • 3
  • Enrica Modica
    • 2
    • 3
  • Anton Giulio Maglione
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marco Mancini
    • 2
  • Gianluca di Flumeri
    • 2
    • 3
  • Fabio Babiloni
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Economics and MarketingIULM UniversityMilanItaly
  2. 2.BrainSigns srlRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Molecular MedicineUniversity of Rome SapienzaRomeItaly

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