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Process Intensification in Biotechnology Applications

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview on how process intensification has influenced biotechnology applications from a multidisciplinary perspective. Initially, the process intensification philosophy is contextualized into biotechnology due to the particular challenges of these processes. This leads to a conceptual map analyzing the disciplines’ interaction to achieve bioprocesses intensification. Subsequently, intensification is explored mainly from transforming biomass into chemicals point of view as an integrated solution addressed within the biorefinery concept. The chapter focuses into revising and presenting representative examples from process engineering perspective. First, how to enhance raw materials utilization in fermentations and enzymatic systems is presented. Secondly, advances on in situ product removal/recovery in order to enhance the reaction environment are presented, emphasizing on membrane bioreactor technologies. Finally, some current and future challenges are assessed to achieve bioprocess intensification. We strongly believe that developing bioprocess intensification philosophy will bring new perspectives to increase the cost-effectiveness of industrial applications towards a more sustainable future.

Keywords

  • Ethanol Production
  • Corn Stover
  • Liquid Membrane
  • Hybrid Membrane
  • Membrane Bioreactor

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Héctor Hernández-Escoto .

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Prado-Rubio, O.A., Morales-Rodríguez, R., Andrade-Santacoloma, P., Hernández-Escoto, H. (2016). Process Intensification in Biotechnology Applications. In: Segovia-Hernández, J., Bonilla-Petriciolet, A. (eds) Process Intensification in Chemical Engineering. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28392-0_7

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