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Connectivity and the Consequences of Being (Dis)connected

  • Adrian Tanti
  • Dimitrios BuhalisEmail author
Conference paper

Abstract

Technology and tourism have worked in tandem for many years. Connectivity is the vehicle that drove the goal of technologically enhanced tourism experiences forward. This study, through an exploratory qualitative research identifies the factors that boost and/or distract travellers from obtaining a connectivity enhanced tourism experience. Four factors can boost and/or distract travellers from being connected: (1) hardware and software, (2) needs and contexts, (3) openness to usage, and (4) supply and provision of connectivity. The research also analyses the positives and/or negative consequences that arise from being connected or disconnected. A Connected/Disconnected Consequences Model illustrates five forms of positive and/or negative consequences: (1) availability, (2) communication, (3) information obtainability, (4) time consumption, and (5) supporting experiences. A better understanding of the role and consequence of connectivity during the trip can enhance traveller experience.

Keywords

Connectivity During-trip stage Disconnection Selective unplugging Social Wi-Fi 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research work disclosed in this publication is partially funded by the MASTER it! Scholarship Scheme. The scholarship is part-financed by the European Union – European Social Fund.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ManagementBournemouth UniversityDorsetUK

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