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High-Throughput DNA Sequencing and the Next Generation of Molecular Markers in Wildlife Research

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Current Trends in Wildlife Research

Part of the book series: Wildlife Research Monographs ((WIREMO,volume 1))

Abstract

Molecular markers have found pervasive application in the study of wildlife populations, informing issues as broad such as the evolutionary relationships among species, population genetic structure and gene flow among populations, and relatedness among individuals. The type and scope of molecular markers favoured by molecular ecologists is currently undergoing a change, prompted by the development of high-throughput, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of these new sequencing approaches and highlight their utility to provide novel insight in wildlife research by yielding orders of magnitude more polymorphism data and facilitating analysis of both the neutral and adaptive components of the genome. Recent studies in key or emerging research areas that is benefitting from the use of next-generation sequencing are described, which includes conservation genetics, epigenetics, resolving the genetic basis of ecologically important traits, and speciation genomics.

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Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Marius Wenzel, Carles Vilà, Heather Ritchie, Alex Douglas and Martha Gavan for comment, content and discussion. Support was provided through a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship.

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Piertney, S.B. (2016). High-Throughput DNA Sequencing and the Next Generation of Molecular Markers in Wildlife Research. In: Mateo, R., Arroyo, B., Garcia, J. (eds) Current Trends in Wildlife Research. Wildlife Research Monographs, vol 1. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27912-1_9

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