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Periodization and Recovery in the Young Tennis Athlete

Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Pediatric and Adolescent Sports Medicine book series (PASM)

Abstract

Tennis is known as a sport without a true off-season. This is especially true for junior players. There are local weekend tournaments to regional, national, or high-level international-level tournaments almost every week. A limited off-season during the tennis calendar makes it difficult to implement a traditional periodization model for young tennis athletes. Therefore, it is very important to understand annual tennis and other training schedules to create an individualized plan to support a long-term athletic development (LTAD) as a tennis athlete and avoid potential risk of injuries, overtraining, or burnout. A tennis-specific periodization program is appropriate. Also, it is important to understand young tennis athletes’ growth and maturation issues because it greatly affects on- and off-court training intensities and volumes as well as numbers of tournament and matches to play each year.

Keywords

Growth and maturation Planning Scheduling 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.USTA Player Development IncorporatedBoca RatonUSA
  2. 2.Life Sport Science Institute and Department of Sport Health ScienceLife UniversityMariettaUSA

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