International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling

Interactive Storytelling pp 235-242 | Cite as

Generating Side Quests from Building Blocks

  • Tomáš Hromada
  • Martin Černý
  • Michal Bída
  • Cyril Brom
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9445)

Abstract

Computer games are an important application area for interactive storytelling. In a large subset of games, quests — tasks that the player is assigned to complete — are the primary driving forces of the storyline. The main storyline is usually accompanied by a number of optional side-quests. We present a system for generating side-quests based on chaining simple building blocks, akin to the branching narrative approach to interactive storytelling. Our primary interest was how far can we get with such a simple approach. The simplicity of our system also lets game designers retain more control over the space of possible side-quests, making the system more suitable for mainstream computer games. We implemented the system in an experimental game and compared the quests generated by the system with hand-picked and random sequences of building blocks. We performed two rounds of player evaluation (\(N_{1} = 21\), \(N_{2} = 12\)), which has shown promising results.

Keywords

Quests Computer games Role-playing games 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomáš Hromada
    • 1
  • Martin Černý
    • 1
  • Michal Bída
    • 1
  • Cyril Brom
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Software and Computer Science EducationCharles University in PraguePragueCzech Republic

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