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Staff Training in Positive Behavior Support

  • Anne MacDonaldEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Evidence-Based Practices in Behavioral Health book series (EBPBH)

Abstract

This chapter reviews staff training in Positive Behavior Support (PBS) and considers the outcomes from published reviews of PBS training. Firstly, the development of PBS is briefly outlined and the need for staff training in PBS is identified; the chapter then goes on to describe what PBS training is, based on a range of studies which have attempted to define this. Four key features are presented as being essential in the definition of PBS training; based on these key features, 15 studies presenting outcomes from PBS training have been identified and the findings from these studies are summarized. A discussion of the findings follows, concluding with some recommendations for future training in PBS.

Keywords

Challenging behavior Positive behavior support Training 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Richmond Fellowship ScotlandScotlandUK

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