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Stereotomy of Wave Jointed Blocks

Toward a Wave-Jointed Stone Construction Using Wire Cutter Toolpath Generation
  • Simon WeirEmail author
  • Dion Moult
  • Shayani Fernando
Chapter

Abstract

This paper focuses on developing a system for using 6-axis robotic arms to cut interlocking blocks with wire. Tracing the trajectory of stereotomy through millennia of practice, an extrapolation is presented that stereotomy will serve increased formal and structural complexity. The addition of robotic carving to stereotomy also removes the ethical-aesthetic connection between the carver’s effort and the visual attention given to the object. This leads to the design of a wave jointed block capable of an extended structural ability, concealing the majority of the cutting effort inside the joined blocks. The proposed fabrication system uses a wire cutter end effector following a toolpath generated from quad based mesh topologies. This single tool cutting system maximises the efficiency of the cutting process and returns the once technical aspects of robotic construction back to the designer.

Keywords

Stereotomy Toolpath automation Digital fabrication Vaults Wave joint 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research has been supported by The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, The University of Sydney, and was produced at DMaF.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Architecture, Design and PlanningSydney UniversitySydneyAustralia

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