Robot Operating System (ROS) pp 187-213

Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 625) | Cite as

People Detection, Tracking and Visualization Using ROS on a Mobile Service Robot

Chapter

Abstract

In this case study chapter, we discuss the implementation and deployment of a ROS-based, multi-modal people detection and tracking framework on a custom-built mobile service robot during the EU FP7 project SPENCER. The mildly humanized robot platform is equipped with five computers and an array of RGB-D, stereo and 2D laser range sensors. After describing the robot platform, we illustrate our real-time perception pipeline starting from ROS-based people detection modules for RGB-D and 2D laser data, via nodes for aggregating detections from multiple sensors, up to person and group tracking. For each stage of the pipeline, we provide sample code online. We also present a set of highly configurable, custom RViz plugins for visualizing detected and tracked persons and groups. Due to the flexible and modular structure of our pipeline, all of our components can easily be reused in custom setups. Finally, we outline how to generate test data using a pedestrian simulator and Gazebo. We conclude with quantitative results from our experiments and lessons that we learned during the project. To our knowledge, the presented framework is the functionally most complete one that is currently available for ROS as open-source software.

Keywords

People detection People tracking Group tracking Perception  Service robot Mobile robot Sensors Visualization 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Social Robotics LaboratoryUniversity of FreiburgFreiburg im BreisgauGermany

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