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Procedures to Investigate Waterborne Illness

  • International Association for Food Protection
Chapter

Abstract

Humanity could not survive without a reliably clean, safe, and steady flow of drinking water. Since the early 1900s when typhoid fever and cholera were frequently causes of waterborne illness in developed countries, drinking water supplies have been protected and treated to ensure water safety, quality, and quantity. Having access to safe drinking water has always been one of the cornerstones of good public health. Not only safe water is limited to drinking water, but recreational water can also be a source for waterborne illness—both from treated waters such as in swimming pools, whirlpools, or splash pads and from non-treated surface waters such as lakes, rivers, streams and ponds. Recreational waters may cause illness not only from ingestion of pathogens, but also when in contact with eyes, ears, or skin. Some pathogens in water can be acquired by inhalation of aerosols from water that is agitated or sprayed such as in humidifiers, fountains, or misting of produce. This poses a potential risk to those exposed, particularly if they are immunocompromised.

Keywords

Etiologic Agent Fecal Coliform Water Utility Chlorine Dioxide Waterborne Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Committee and Association thank and cite the following persons for their assistance in critically reviewing parts of this edition:

E. Rickamer Hoover (CDC/ONDIEH/NCEH)

Richard Sakaji (East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland California)

John Hanlin (Ecolab, Eagan, Minnesota)

Phyllis Posy (Atlantium Technologies, Israel)

The Committee and Association thank and cite the following Committee members for their We would also like to acknowledge the contributors to the second edition of this manual:

Frank L. Bryan, O.D. (Pete) Cook, Kim Fox, John J. Guzewich, Dennis Juranek, Daniel Maxson, Christine Moe, Richard C. Swanson, Ewen C.D. Todd

The Committee and Association thank and cite the following persons for their assistance in developing, writing, editing, and/or critically reviewing the second edition of this manual:

Procedures to Investigate Waterborne IllnessRuth A. Bryan, Robert Burhans, Rebecca Calderon, James D. Decker, John M. Dunn, David Frederickson, Arie H. Havelaar, Howard Hutchings, M. Louise Martin, George K. Morris, Dale Morse, J. Virgil Peavy, Patricia Potter, Richard Vogt, Irving Weitzman

Committee members of the first edition who established the objectives and scope of the manual and also developed some of the technical content that is included in this revision are gratefully acknowledged:

Herbert W. Anderson, K.J. Baker, Gunther F. Craun, Ward Duel, Keith H. Lewis, Thomas W. McKinley, R. Ashley Robinson, Richard C. Swanson, Ewen C.D. Todd

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© International Association for Food Protection 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • International Association for Food Protection
    • 1
  1. 1.for Food ProtectionInternational AssociationMaryvilleUSA

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