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The Demographic Legacy

  • David A. SwansonEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

Once the Census Board became part of state government, its staff became permanent and more professionalized over time. The statutory basis on which the Board was based was enlarged over time and this continued after it moved to state government. This chapter traces these developments and identifies key players involved in them.

Keywords

Staff professionalization Training and research Statutory basis strengthened 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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