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The Washington State Census Board, 1943–1967

  • David A. SwansonEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

This chapter describes the initial establishment of the Board at the University of Washington under the direction of Dr. Calvin F. Schmid in 1943. Its initial activities and reports are described and in chronological order we follow the census board through its initial period of temporary funding to the time it received long term funding as its duties expanded to include enrollment forecasts for the K-12 system and the state’s universities and colleges. It describes the key players in establishing and operating the Board as well as key legislative actions, such as tying funding to population estimates and forecasts The Chapter describes actions of administrators at Washington State University to have the Board disbanded. It concludes with a description of the move of the Board’s functions to state government under the administration of Governor Daniel J. Evans.

Keywords

Demographic methods Public fund allocation Institutional conflict 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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