D-A-CH Conference on Energy Informatics

Energy Informatics pp 24-35 | Cite as

Energy Service Description for Capabilities of Distributed Energy Resources

  • Tim Dethlefs
  • Christoph Brunner
  • Thomas Preisler
  • Oliver Renke
  • Wolfgang Renz
  • Andrea Schröder
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9424)

Abstract

The increasing number of volatile Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) in the electricity grid implies a rising level of complexity and dynamics. The integration and management of these DERs have lead to the introduction of the aggregator role, with the aim of providing energy services to system operators and the market. With regard to the often changing capabilities of DERs, the dynamical aggregation of DERs to meet the demand is still a matter of concern. In this paper a generic description for the capabilities of DERs will be introduced in order to allow the aggregator to efficiently search and find DERs suitable for aggregation. These reduced as possible and abstracted descriptions of the DER capabilities are called Energy Services, which should be complete enough for the aggregators search demands.

The Energy Service definition will be part of a recent research project, the Open System for Energy Services (OS4ES) that is going to enable the aggregator to control dynamically configured large scale Virtual Power Plants with IEC 61850. The results of this project and its field test should contribute to the further development of IEC 61850.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Dethlefs
    • 1
  • Christoph Brunner
    • 2
  • Thomas Preisler
    • 1
  • Oliver Renke
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Renz
    • 1
  • Andrea Schröder
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Electrical EngineeringHAW HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.It4powerZugSwitzerland
  3. 3.Forschungsgesellschaft Für Elektrische Anlagen und Stromwirtschaft E.V. (FGH)MannheimGermany

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