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Assessing the Suitability of Using Google Glass in Designing 3D Geographic Information for Navigation

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Advances in 3D Geoinformation

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography ((LNGC))

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Abstract

No longer are we bound by traditional 2D physical representations; there is a steady shift towards three-dimensional (3D) data. Existing research recognises landmarks to be important navigationally but specific requirements for geometric and semantic attributes in 3D have not been identified. This study assesses the suitability of using Google Glass in real-world experiments investigating the saliency of environmental objects which facilitate pedestrian navigation. From the experiment carried out with fourteen participants, initial results show geometric and semantic detail for navigation are most pertinent between 1.65–7.5 m for buildings. Visual characteristics such as colour, shape and texture are more relevant than function and use.

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Acknowledgments

This project was funded and supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Ordnance Survey.

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Correspondence to Kelvin Wong .

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Wong, K., Ellul, C. (2017). Assessing the Suitability of Using Google Glass in Designing 3D Geographic Information for Navigation. In: Abdul-Rahman, A. (eds) Advances in 3D Geoinformation. Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-25691-7_23

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