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Integrated Water Resources Management: Concept, Research and Implementation

  • Ralf B. IbischEmail author
  • Janos J. Bogardi
  • Dietrich Borchardt
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews the concept, contemporary research efforts and the implementation of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) which has evolved as the guiding water management paradigm over the last three decades. After analyzing the starting points and historical developments of the IWRM concept this chapter expands on relations with recently upcoming concepts emphasizing adaptive water management and the land-water-food-energy nexus. Although being practically adopted worldwide, IWRM is still a major research topic in water sciences and its implementation is a great challenge for many countries. We have selected fourteen comprehensive IWRM research projects with worldwide coverage for a meta-analysis of motivations, settings, approaches and implementation. Aiming to be an up-to-date interdisciplinary scientific reference, this chapter provides a comprehensive theoretical and empirical analysis of contemporary IWRM research, examples of science based implementations and a synthesis of the lessons learnt. The chapter concludes with some major future challenges, the solving of which will further strengthen the IWRM concept.

Keywords

Sustainable development IWRM Adaptive management Nexus approach Global change 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The editors would like to thank the researchers who responded to our call and provided research results or reviews for this book on IWRM. Thanks also to the numerous independent reviewers who gave valuable comments on earlier drafts of the manuscripts. The funding by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) which has made the research and this publication possible is gratefully acknowledged. The authors thank Dr Stephan Klapp of Springer publishing for his interest in highlighting the IWRM topic with this book and his highly constructive cooperation during the entire publishing process.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralf B. Ibisch
    • 1
    Email author
  • Janos J. Bogardi
    • 2
  • Dietrich Borchardt
    • 1
  1. 1.Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZMagdeburgGermany
  2. 2.Center for Development Research - ZEFUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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