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The Past Three Population Censuses: A Deepening Ageing Population in Indonesia

  • Evi Nurvidya ArifinEmail author
  • Aris Ananta
Chapter
Part of the Demographic Transformation and Socio-Economic Development book series (DTSD, volume 5)

Abstract

This paper highlights a deepening ageing population in Indonesia between 1990 and 2010, a period which witnessed political change from an authoritarian regime to a democratizing one. This transition brought a drastic shift in population policy, with much weaker family planning programmes than during the authoritarian regime. Our assessment from the population censuses suggests that the proportion of the population aged 60 years and above rose from 6.3 % in 1990 to 7.6 % in 2010, corresponding to an increase from 11.3 million to 18 million over 20 years. The growth rate of older persons for this period is well above that of the general population, 4.7 % vs 2.9 % annually.

This paper also shows a large variation in the age structure of the sub-national population. The structure at the national level remains heavily affected only by changes in fertility and mortality. However, changes at sub-national levels, particularly district level, have also been determined by migration.

The censuses also depict a significant improvement in educational attainment of older persons. The proportion without schooling decreased to 31.6 % in 2010 from 58.5 % in 1990. Over the same period, participation of the elderly in the labour market rose from 48.1 to 51.2 %.

Keywords

Living Arrangement Total Fertility Rate Population Census Support Ratio Labor Force Participation Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Ageing StudiesUniversity of IndonesiaDepokIndonesia
  2. 2.Faculty of Economics and BusinessUniversity of IndonesiaDepokIndonesia

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