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Demographic Patterns of Indonesia’s Urbanization, 2000–2010: Continuity and Change at the Macro Level

Part of the Demographic Transformation and Socio-Economic Development book series (DTSD,volume 5)

Abstract

This study will identify the urbanization pattern in Indonesia by applying simple statistical methods to the readily available data of the 2000 and 2010 Indonesian Population Censuses. Urban localities (desa urban) and population are still largely concentrated on the island of Java, which reflects the urban development disparity between Java and the Outer Islands, despite the fact that some Outer Island Provinces have already experienced rapid urbanization. The peripheral areas of large cities experienced more rapid annual population growth than the core of the cities. There have been significant increases in the proportion of urban population in some provinces outside Java over the period 2000–2010. Nonetheless, small and intermediate cities outside Java play a more important role as centers of socioeconomic activities compared to those in Java. In general, the recent pattern of Indonesia’s urbanization reflects a continuity from the situation in 1990 and 2000, but at present some regions outside Java have begun to undergo a rapid increase in the urbanization level and urban population growth.

Keywords

  • Gross Domestic Product
  • Urban Population
  • Core City
  • Capita Gross Domestic Product
  • Medium City

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 16.1
Fig. 16.2

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Correspondence to Tommy Firman .

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Firman, T. (2016). Demographic Patterns of Indonesia’s Urbanization, 2000–2010: Continuity and Change at the Macro Level. In: Guilmoto, C., Jones, G. (eds) Contemporary Demographic Transformations in China, India and Indonesia. Demographic Transformation and Socio-Economic Development, vol 5. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24783-0_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24783-0_16

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