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Substance-Induced Anxiety and Co-occurring Anxiety Disorders

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Substance Use and the Acute Psychiatric Patient

Abstract

Substance-induced anxiety (SIA) is sparsely found in literature but is commonly seen in the emergency department (ED) and can be associated with a wide range of substances. It can be challenging in the acute setting to differentiate anxiety symptoms associated with intoxication or withdrawal from those associated with a primary anxiety disorder exacerbated by substance use, but it is important to try to distinguish SIA from non-substance-induced anxiety disorders to guide appropriate treatment. Patient history and, at times, laboratory findings are essential in diagnosing SIA. Treatment and disposition options vary and are guided by the severity of presenting symptoms, final diagnosis, and safety concerns.

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Correspondence to Joanna Piechniczek-Buczek .

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Blaney, D., Jackson, A.K., Toy, O., Fitzgerald, A., Piechniczek-Buczek, J. (2019). Substance-Induced Anxiety and Co-occurring Anxiety Disorders. In: Donovan, A., Bird, S. (eds) Substance Use and the Acute Psychiatric Patient. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-23961-3_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-23961-3_8

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