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Some Practical and Ethical Challenges Posed by Big Data

  • Michael FullerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Science and Religion: Publications of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology book series (ESSSAT)

Abstract

‘Big Data’ is a term that has been coined to describe the very large datasets that may be accrued through the use of modern computers. The collection and analysis of big data, and its presentation to others, raise a number of important questions, notably ethical questions, which impinge on the lives of citizens. The Churches, not least through their engagement with scholarship in the area of science and religion, are uniquely placed both to raise these questions, and to engage with data scientists in addressing them.

Keywords

Big data Data scientist Hermeneutics Ethics Interpretation Science and religion 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Divinity, New CollegeUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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