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Challenges and Future Trends for Cancer Care in Egypt

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Abstract

In Egypt, cancer is already and will become an important health problem not only in terms of rank order, but also in terms of incidence and mortality. The commonest sites were liver among men and breast among women. During the period 2013–2050, population of Egypt is expected to increase to approximately 160 % the 2013 population size. Applying the current age-specific incidence rates to successive populations would lead to a progressive increase in number of incident. The resources for cancer control in Egypt are directed almost exclusively to treatment. Most cancers present at an advanced stage (stage III and IV) when cure is improbable even with the best treatments. According to WHO, 40 % of cancers could be avoided (prevention), 40 % could be cured (if detected early), and the rest should be managed with palliation. So, recognizing palliative care as a new subspecialty for nurses, and expansion of palliative care services to a larger number of patients and illnesses throughout the country, considering home-based palliative care service is urgently and badly needed, strengthening health care systems; focusing on patient centered care, education and training to all levels of health care professionals, and effective cancer prevention programs customized to the community should be fostered, particularly for prevention of hepatitis B and C infection, and breast cancer awareness, reducing cultural barriers, and detecting cancer as early as possible.

Keywords

  • Challenges
  • Future trends
  • Cancer care
  • Palliative care
  • Liver
  • Breast
  • Culture
  • Egypt

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Acknowledgment

The author acknowledges the important and fantastic role played by Prof. Michael Silbermann in increasing health care awareness and establishing palliative care in Middle East Countries, Executive Director, Middle East Cancer Consortium.

Conflict of Interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication.

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Correspondence to Karima Elshamy D.N.Sc. .

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Elshamy, K. (2016). Challenges and Future Trends for Cancer Care in Egypt. In: Silbermann, M. (eds) Cancer Care in Countries and Societies in Transition. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22912-6_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22912-6_9

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

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