Human-Computer Interaction

INTERACT 2015: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2015 pp 47-54 | Cite as

Virtual Buttons for Eyes-Free Interaction: A Study

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9296)

Abstract

The touch screen of mobile devices, such as smart phones and tablets, is their primary input mechanism. While designed to be used in conjunction with its output capabilities, eyes-free interaction is also possible and useful on touch screens. One of the several possible techniques for eyes-free interaction is the virtual button method, where the screen is divided into a regular grid of buttons that can be pressed even without looking at the screen.

This paper contains an exploratory study about influence factors on this interaction method. Results indicate, that not only the size of the buttons matter, but also the device orientation and user dependent factors, such as the age or general experience with touch screens. By involving small children in the evaluation we can see the validity of this approach even for the youngest users.

Keywords

Eyes-free Evaluation Virtual buttons Mobile devices 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computer Graphics and HCI GroupTU KaiserslauternKaiserslauternGermany

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