Advertisement

Anticipation | Computational Creativity

  • Bill SeamanEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cognitive Systems Monographs book series (COSMOS, volume 29)

Abstract

The paper will outline the role of anticipatory systems as part of a set of computationally driven creative processes. Here the goal is to both use the computer as a tool functioning in the service of human creative processes e.g. authoring a system to help compose generative music, as well as to begin to explore “learning” and the abstraction of creative processes in terms of autonomous computational creativity. Anticipation is here undertaken in a mindfully-aware manner, as drawn from the deep study, understanding and articulation of human creativity. Thus, this research seeks to define the driving problems in authoring autonomous generative computational systems through the pragmatic application of biomimetics and bioabstraction, drawing in part on the study of human anticipatory systems that play an active role in creative processes.

Keywords

Computation Creativity Computational creativity Machinic creativity Re-embodied intelligence 

References

  1. 1.
    Rosen, R.: Anticipatory Systems: Philosophical, Mathematical, and Methodological Foundations 2nd edn. (with contributions by Judith Rosen, John J. Klineman and Mihai Nadin). Springer, New York (2012) (Foreword)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    von Foerster, H.: Observing Systems. Intersystems Publication, Seaside California (1981)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rosen, R.: Anticipatory Systems: Philosophical, Mathematical, and Methodological Foundations 2nd edn. (with contributions by Judith Rosen, John J. Klineman and Mihai Nadin), p. 46. Springer, New York (2012)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rosen, R.: Anticipatory Systems: Philosophical, Mathematical, and Methodological Foundations, 2nd edn. (with contributions by Judith Rosen, John J. Klineman and Mihai Nadin), p. 72. Springer, New York (2012)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rosen, R.: Anticipatory Systems: Philosophical, Mathematical, and Methodological Foundations, 2nd edn. (with contributions by Judith Rosen, John J. Klineman and Mihai Nadin), p. 71. Springer, New York (2012)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Boden, M.: Creativity and Art, Three Roads to Surprise, p. 10. Oxford University Press, Oxford (2010)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    ICCC 2013 Sydney Australia. The Fourth International Conference on Computational Creativity. http://www.computationalcreativity.net/iccc2013/ (2014). Accessed 22 June, 2014
  8. 8.
    Seaman, W.: Emergent constructions: re-embodied intelligence within recombinant poetic networks. Digital Creativity 9. 3, pp 153–160 (1998) (paper delivered at Consciousness Reframed conference 1997)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Aleksander, I., Burnett, P.: Thinking Machines—The Search for Artificial Intelligence. Alfred A. Knopf, New York (1987)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Varela, F., Thompson, E., Rosch, E.: The Embodied Mind, Cognitive Science and Human Experience, p. p23. MIT Press, Cambridge (1991)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Locher, P.: How Does a Visual Artist Create an Artwork. In: Kaufman, J., Sternberg, R. (eds.) The Cambridge Handbook of Creativity, Cambridge University Press (for a compendium of empirical approaches to artistic creativity), p. 131 (2010)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Babbage, C.: Notes by The Translator written to clarify the textual work entitled Sketch Of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage by L. F. Menabrea. Charles Babbage and his Calculating Engines: Selected Writings by Charles Babbage and Others. Dover Publications, Inc., New York p. 249Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Seaman, W.: Recombinant poetics and related database aesthetics. In: Vesna, V. (ed.) Database Aesthetics, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis (2007)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Seaman, W.: Recombinant Poetics/Emergent Meaning as Examined and Explored Within a Specific Generative Virtual Environment. VDM Press (2010) (Seaman’s PhD thesis originally published 1999)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Conversation with SupkoGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Seaman, B. The Exquisite Mechanism of Shivers, installation. (1991) See also ARTINTACT. http://on1.zkm.de/zkm/e/werke/TheExquisiteMechanismofShivers (2014). Accessed 2 July 2014
  17. 17.
    Shiffman, D.: Generative Text. http://shiffman.net/teaching/a2z/generative/ (2014). Accessed 2 July 2014
  18. 18.
    Howe, D.: RiTa Tool Kit. http://rednoise.org/rita/ (2014).Accessed 25 August 2014
  19. 19.
    Kurzweil, R.: The Singularity is Near. Viking, New York (2010)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Seaman, B., Rössler, O.E.: Neosentience/The Benevolence Engine. Intellect, London (2010)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Seaman, B.: An Embodied Expansion of Neural Aesthetics—The Aesthetics of Neosentience”, Your Brain on Art: Probing Neuroaesthetics. Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (2008)Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Powers, R.: Galatea 2.2.: NY: Farrar Straus & Giroux. Little, Brown/Abacus, London (1995)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Seaman, B: Object-based Emergent Intention Matrix. http://users.design.ucla.edu/~fwinkler/PSE/eim.html (2014). Accessed 2 July 2014

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ArtArt History & Visual Studies, Media Arts and SciencesDurhamUSA

Personalised recommendations