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Great Comets, and Wellington’s Earliest European Astronomers

  • Wayne Orchiston
Chapter
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 422)

Abstract

During the 1840s, soon after the initial European settlement of Port Nicholson, Wellington gained its first scientific astronomers, and these included the surveyors R. Sheppard and W.M. Smith. The early settlers also included J.H. Marriott, who had trained as a scientific instrument-maker in England, but there is little evidence that he practised this trade once he reached New Zealand.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to the following for their assistance: Pendreigh Brown (Wellington, NZ), Susan Djabri (Horsham, England), the late Tony Dodson (Wellington, NZ), Judy Siers (Wellington, NZ), Laureen Sadlier (Museum of Wellington, NZ) and staff at the Alexander Turnbull Library. I also am grateful to the Donovan Astronomical Trust (Sydney) for helping fund my archival research in Cambridge. Finally, I wish to thank Pendreigh Brown and Susan Djabri for reading and commenting on the first draft of this chapter, and Susan Dabri, Warwick Marriott (Wellington, NZ) and Carl Romick (Richmond, California, USA), for kindly supplying Figs. 20.2, 20.4, 20.5 and 20.6.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Astronomical Research Institute of ThailandChiang MaiThailand

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