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English Language Education in the Philippines: Policies, Problems, and Prospects

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English Language Education Policy in Asia

Part of the book series: Language Policy ((LAPO,volume 11))

Abstract

The integration of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) in 2015, as well as the United Nation’s call for Education for All (EFA) by 2015, has pushed the Philippine government to revamp the country’s educational system. Such revamp involves a review of the effectiveness of English language education (ELE) in the country, which may be described as currently at a crossroads, as stakeholders strive to address issues of developing the English language competencies of Filipino students on the one hand, and the strengthening of academic achievement on the other. ELE in the Philippines, which began during the American colonial period in the nineteenth century, has been found wanting in significantly contributing to increased learning outcomes among Filipino students. ELE policies have been beset with issues of alignment and coherence in the areas of curriculum and assessment, as well as challenges in the implementation of genuine reform. In addition, ELE has been implemented at the expense of literacy in the mother tongues. This chapter provides an overview of how ELE in the Philippines is evolving – learning from past mistakes and preparing for the future. The chapter is divided into five major parts, namely, (1) overview of the Philippine educational system; (2) ELE from the American colonial period to Martial Law; (3) Bilingual education and educational reforms from 1974 to 2010; (4) Mother-tongue based multilingual education (MTBMLE) and the K to 12 reform; and (5) prospects and possibilities for ELE in the Philippines. In this chapter, we make a case for Philippine ELE that strives to address the demands of the international community, but also upholds local culture through the use of the mother tongues.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In 1987, the national language “Pilipino” was re-named “Filipino” in the new Constitution adopted by the post-Martial Law government of President Corazon C. Aquino (Gonzalez, 1998).

Abbreviations

AEC:

ASEAN Economic Community

AFREP:

ASEAN Framework of Reference for English Proficiency

ASEAN:

Association of South East Asian Nations

BEC:

Basic Education Curriculum

BEP:

Bilingual Education Policy

BESRA:

Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda

BPO:

Business Process Outsourcing

CEFR:

Common European Framework of Reference

CHED:

Commission on Higher Education

DepEd:

Department of Education

EBEP:

Enhanced Basic Education Program

EDCOM:

Congressional Commission on Education

EFA:

Education for All

ELE:

English Language Education

ELT:

English Language Teaching

EO:

Executive Order

HEI:

Higher Education Institution

HB:

House Bill

K-12:

Kindergarten to 12th Grade

L1:

First Language

L2:

Second Language

L3:

Third Language

MDG:

Millennium Development Goals

MO:

Memorandum Order

MOI:

Medium of Instruction

MTBMLE:

Mother-Tongue Based Multilingual Education

NAT:

National Achievement Test

OFW:

Overseas Filipino Workers

PCER:

Presidential Commission for Educational Reform

PCPE:

Presidential Commission to Survey Philippine Education

PQF:

Philippine Qualifications Framework

TESDA:

Technical Education and Skills Development Authority

UBD:

Understanding by Design

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Correspondence to Marilu Rañosa Madrunio .

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Madrunio, M.R., Martin, I.P., Plata, S.M. (2016). English Language Education in the Philippines: Policies, Problems, and Prospects. In: Kirkpatrick, R. (eds) English Language Education Policy in Asia. Language Policy, vol 11. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22464-0_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22464-0_11

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-22463-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-22464-0

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

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