Skip to main content

Translating Indigenous Reciprocity into University-Led Arts Practice and Assessment

  • Chapter
Engaging First Peoples in Arts-Based Service Learning

Part of the book series: Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education ((LAAE,volume 18))

Abstract

Reciprocity as a measure of exchange and service has deep resonances for many Indigenous communities. For universities that aim to encourage student-learning processes and foster relationships with communities, Indigenous-led measures of reciprocity have been engaging and useful. For communities where student placements and activities provide skills support across areas of need to the community, it can be a tool to manage and foster the relationship. While this is often directed by industry standards and protocols, particularly across the areas of health and education, in the broad creative arts the boundaries are blurred between learner, artist, community-member, expert practitioner and service provider.

This chapter challenges a framing of community solely as recipient and university as informed provider of services, by highlighting where reciprocity can assist in developing meaningful and enduring relationships not just between the institutions, but also for individuals engaged in the process. Translating this reciprocity into a form that universities can understand in the context of learning and assessment is then the goal of all participants and the beginning rather than a capstone end to a learning journey.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or eBook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

Notes

  1. 1.

    Including Closing the Gap, a Government initiative that addresses the differences between Indigenous Australians and the rest of the community (Holland, 2015).

References

  • Arabena, K. (2005). Not fit for modern Australian society: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the new arrangements for the administration of Indigenous affairs (AIATSIS Discussion Paper). Canberra: AIATSIS.

    Google Scholar 

  • Asmar, C., & Page, S. (2009). Sources of satisfaction and stress among Indigenous academic teachers: Findings from a national Australian study. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 29(3), 387–401.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bartleet, B. (2011, July). Stories of reconciliation: Building cross-cultural collaborations between Indigenous musicians and undergraduate music students in Tennant Creek. Australian Journal of Music Education, 2011(2), 11–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bartleet, B., Bennett, D., Marsh, K., Power, A., & Sunderland, N. (2014). Reconciliation and transformation through mutual learning: Outlining a framework for arts-based service learning with Indigenous communities in Australia. International Journal of Education and the Arts, 15(8), 1–23.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bartleet, B., Bennett, D., Power, A., & Sunderland, N. (2014). Enhancing Indigenous content in arts curricula through service learning with Indigenous communities. Sydney, Australia: Australian Office for Learning and Teaching.

    Google Scholar 

  • Behrendt, L. (2004, December 8). Nothing mutual about denying Aborigines a voice. Sydney Morning Herald, p. 13.

    Google Scholar 

  • Behrendt, L., Larkin, S., Griew, R., & Kelly, P. (2012). Review of higher education access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Final report. Canberra, Australia: DIISRTE.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bennett, B., Zubrzycki, J., & Bacon, V. (2011). What do we know? The experiences of social workers working alongside Aboriginal people. Australian Social Work, 64(1), 20–37.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bradley, D., Noonan, P., Nugent, H., & Scales, B. (2008). Bradley review of higher education: Final report. Canberra, Australia: DEEWR, Commonwealth of Australia.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bretag, T., & Mahmud, S. (2014). Embedding and extending exemplary academic integrity policy and support frameworks across the higher education sector: Final report. Sydney, Australia: Australian Office for Learning and Teaching.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, M. (2003). Who owns native culture? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Burbank, V. (2014). Envy and egalitarianism in Aboriginal Australia: An integrative approach. Australian Journal of Anthropology, 25(1), 1–21.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Burrows, R. (2012). Living with the h-index? Metric assemblages in the contemporary academy. The Sociological Review, 60, 355–372.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Campbell, A. (2010). Developing generic skills and attributes of international students: The (ir)relevance of the Australian university experience. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 32(5), 487–497.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Central Land Council Website. (n. d.). Kinship and skin names. Retrieved September 11, 2014, from http://www.clc.org.au/articles/info/aboriginal-kinship

  • Cooper, S. (2013). MOOCs: Disrupting the university or business as usual? Arena Journal, 39–40: General Issue, 182–203.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fasoli, L., & Farmer, R. (2011). You’re in new country. Dubbo, Australia: Charles Sturt University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fredericks, B. (2013). We don’t leave our identities at the city limits: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban localities. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2013(1), 4–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Holland, C. (2015). Close the gap: Progress and priorities report. Sydney, Australia: Australian Human Rights Commission.

    Google Scholar 

  • Janke, T. (2009). Beyond guarding ground: A vision for a national Indigenous cultural authority. Rosebury: Terri Janke and Co., Rosebery.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kovach, M. (2009). Indigenous methodologies: Characteristics, conversations, and contexts. Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maurrasse, D. (2001). Beyond the campus: How colleges and universities form partnerships with their communities. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • McKinnon, C. (2014). From scar trees to a ‘bouquet of words’: Aboriginal text is everywhere. In C. McKinnon, T. Neale, & E. Vincent (Eds.), History, power, text (pp. 371–383). Sydney: UTSe Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McNamara, J., Kift, S. M., Butler, D., Field, R. M., Brown, C., & Gamble, N. (2012). Work-integrated learning as a component of the capstone experience in undergraduate law. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 13(1), 1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moreton-Robinson, A. (2000). Talkin’ up to the white woman: Indigenous women and feminism. St Lucia: University of Queensland Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nakata, M. (1998). Anthropological texts and Indigenous standpoints. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2, 3–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pholi, K., Black, D., & Richards, C. (2009). Is ‘close the gap’ a useful approach to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians? Australian Review of Public Affairs, 9(2), 1–14.

    Google Scholar 

  • Regan, C., & Troy, J. (2014). Blackwords and ‘reciprocal recognitions’. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2014(1), 119–125.

    Google Scholar 

  • Riley, A. R. (2005). ‘Straight stealing’: Towards an Indigenous system of cultural property protection. Washington Law Review, 80(1), 69.

    Google Scholar 

  • Russell, L. (2011). Borrowed dances: Appropriation, authenticity and performing ‘identity’ in Prescott, Arizona, 1921–1990. Australasian Drama Studies, 59, 39–52.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scott, K. (2014). From drill to dance. In B. Neumeier & K. Schaffer (Eds.), Decolonizing the landscape: Indigenous cultures in Australia (Cross/Cultures, 173, pp. 3–22). Amsterdam: Rodopi.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thomas, K., & Chan, J. (2013). Negotiating the paradox of creative autonomy in the making of artists. Studies in Art Education, 54(3), 260–272.

    Google Scholar 

  • Williams, J. J. (2014). Teacher educator professional learning in the third space: Implications for identity and practice. Journal of Teacher Education, 65(4), 315–326.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Young, J. O., & Brunk, C. G. (Eds.). (2012). The ethics of cultural appropriation. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sandy O’Sullivan .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

O’Sullivan, S. (2016). Translating Indigenous Reciprocity into University-Led Arts Practice and Assessment. In: Bartleet, BL., Bennett, D., Power, A., Sunderland, N. (eds) Engaging First Peoples in Arts-Based Service Learning. Landscapes: the Arts, Aesthetics, and Education, vol 18. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22153-3_2

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22153-3_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-22152-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-22153-3

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics