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The Fetal Observable Movement System (FOMS)

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Abstract

In this chapter we describe a newly developed, objective coding system of fetal facial movements. It is argued that such a system is not only necessary to compare results from different laboratories but also has the potential to be used clinically in order to identify compromised fetuses. Furthermore, the system can be used to record fetal behaviors relating to maturation of fetal abilities such as expression of complex facial gestalts as well as sequential movements and reactions to external stimulation (e.g., sound, touch and light).

Keywords

  • Fetal Face
  • Facial Movements (FMs)
  • Objective Coding System
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  • Reissland

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Correspondence to Nadja Reissland DPhil, Cpsychol .

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Reissland, N., Francis, B., Buttanshaw, L. (2016). The Fetal Observable Movement System (FOMS). In: Reissland, N., Kisilevsky, B. (eds) Fetal Development. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22023-9_9

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