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Chord Recognition

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Abstract

In music, harmony refers to the simultaneous sound of different notes that form a cohesive entity in the mind of the listener. The main constituent components of harmony, at least in the Western music tradition, are chords, which are musical constructs that typically consist of three or more notes. Harmony analysis may be thought of as the study of the construction, interaction, and progression of chords. The progression of chords over time closely relates to what is often referred to as the harmonic content of a piece of music. These progressions are of musical importance for composing, describing, and understanding Western tonal music including popular, jazz, and classical music.

Keywords

  • Hide Markov Model
  • Observation Sequence
  • Chroma Feature
  • Pitch Class
  • Major Scale

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Meinard Müller .

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Müller, M. (2015). Chord Recognition. In: Fundamentals of Music Processing. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21945-5_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21945-5_5

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