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Addressing Social Exclusion in Schools and Youth Groups

  • Rivkie IvesEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces a new concept of inadvertent social exclusion, suggesting that some young people become excluded unintentionally through the process of group dynamics—a concept that is enhanced through the prism of Jewish social values. Comprising three main sections, the chapter begins by setting out how group dynamics may lead to inadvertent social exclusion, continues with a discussion of Judaic values that inform the issue of inclusion, and concludes with qualitative and quantitative research findings on a series of workshops designed to address this issue. The chapter offers practical steps that can be introduced in schools and youth groups to sensitise young people and their older carers about the effects of group dynamics on exclusion and to bring about change on this issue.

Keywords

Exclusion Group dynamics Bullying Jewish values Sensitivity Youth groups Playground Games 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tag Institute for Social DevelopmentLondonEngland

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