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Introduction

  • MJ Eadie
  • FJE Vajda

Abstract

It is now widely accepted that, as far as possible, the intake of therapeutic drugs is better avoided during pregnancy because of their possible harmful effects on the developing foetus. However, in some clinical situations, the benefit achieved by preserving maternal health may justify continuing therapeutic drug intake during pregnancy. One such commonly encountered situation is the treatment of epilepsy. A good deal of information has accumulated regarding pregnant human bodies’ handling of antiepileptic drugs and their effects on the physical and intellectual development of the foetus. The present book attempts to provide an account of this information and to discuss its application in the management of pregnant women with seizure disorders, recognising that the principles that apply in this situation are likely to also be valid in guiding the management of other disorders, particularly psychiatric ones, in which this class of drugs may also need to be used during human pregnancy

Keywords

Antiepileptic Drug Therapeutic Drug Seizure Disorder Postnatal Development Epileptic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Bobo WV, Davis RL, Toh S et al (2012) Trends in the use of antiepileptic drugs among pregnant women in the US, 2001–2007: a medication exposure in pregnancy risk evaluation program study. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 26:578–588PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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  3. Newport DJ, Stowe ZN, Viguera AC et al (2008) Lamotrigine in bipolar disorder: efficacy during pregnancy. Bipolar Disord 10:432–436CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Viguera AC, Whitfield T, Baldessarini RJ et al (2007) Risk of recurrence in women with bipolar disorder during pregnancy: prospective study of mood stabilizer discontinuation. Am J Psychiatry 164:1817–1824CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • MJ Eadie
    • 1
  • FJE Vajda
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinical Neurology and NeuropharmacologyUniversity of Queensland, and Honorary Consultant Neurologist, Royal Brisbane and Women’s HospitalBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Medicine and Neurology Director of the Australian Epilepsy and Pregnancy RegisterUniversity of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne HospitalMelbourneAustralia

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