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Clinical Evaluation of Residual Brain Function and Responsiveness in Disorders of Consciousness

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Abstract

The neuronal processes that sustain consciousness, arousal and awareness interfered within disorders of consciousness remain poorly defined. As a consequence, subjects with DoC are classified (and the residual brain functions are assessed) based on vital and neurological signs and behavioural patterns. Efficient and reliable clinical scales have been designed and are commonly in use for the bedside evaluation of subjects with DoC. Problems in defining consciousness and its behavioural descriptors by unambiguous, common and applicable terms nevertheless still limit the classification of DoC as distinct diagnostic entities.

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Binder, H. (2016). Clinical Evaluation of Residual Brain Function and Responsiveness in Disorders of Consciousness. In: Monti, M., Sannita, W. (eds) Brain Function and Responsiveness in Disorders of Consciousness. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21425-2_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21425-2_4

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-21424-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-21425-2

  • eBook Packages: MedicineMedicine (R0)

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