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Neut: “Hey, Let Her Speak”

Design of a Speech Eliciting Robot that Intervenes in Brainstorming Sessions to Ensure Collaborative Group Work
  • Naoki OhshimaEmail author
  • Tatsuya Watanabe
  • Natsuki Saito
  • Riyo Fujimori
  • Hiroko Tokunaga
  • Naoki Mukawa
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 528)

Abstract

In this research, we developed a speech eliciting robot (Neut) that ensures a cooperative brainstorming environment. Neut creates an atmosphere that makes it easier for participants who are often overlooked to express their ideas, by promoting cooperation from the other participants. Neut moves freely on a table and approaches one or the other participant who has not yet had his/her speaking turn. After stopping in front of such a participant, it brings out a microphone and prompts the participant to speak, while looking around restlessly to suggest to others that they give the participant a chance to speak. In this paper, we will discuss the design of Neut in encouraging participants to speak out, while maintaining neutrality by not itself speaking as a participant.

Keywords

Persuasive robot Social etiquette Conversation analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was partially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research [C] 23500158, 2011–2013, [C] 26330233, 2014), and Research Institute for Science and Technology of Tokyo Denki University Grant Number Q13J-01/Japan.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naoki Ohshima
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tatsuya Watanabe
    • 1
  • Natsuki Saito
    • 1
  • Riyo Fujimori
    • 1
  • Hiroko Tokunaga
    • 1
  • Naoki Mukawa
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information EnvironmentTokyo Denki UniversityTokyoJapan

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