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Abstract

Pluridisciplinar convergence is a major problem that had emerged with human-artefact Systems and so-called “Augmented Humanity” as academical fields and even more as technical fields. Problems come mainly from the juxtaposition of two very different types of system, a biological one and an artificial one. Thus, conceiving and designing the multiple couplings between them has become a major difficulty. Some came with reductionnist solutions to answer these problems but since we know that a biological system and a technical system are different, this approach is limited from its beginning.

Using a specifically designed questionnaire and statistical analysis we determined how specialists (medical practitioners, ergonomists and engineers) in the domain conceive themselves what is a human-artifact System and how they relate to existent traditions and we showed that some of them relate to the integrativist views.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.PErSEUs (EA 7312)Université de LorraineNancyFrance
  2. 2.LORIA - MOSELNancyFrance
  3. 3.ICN Business School NancyNancyFrance

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