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Forced External Flow Over a Rotating Disk

  • Igor V. ShevchukEmail author
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Part of the Mathematical Engineering book series (MATHENGIN)

Abstract

This chapter presents results of the analytical and numerical modelling of external flow over a rotating disk and outward flow between parallel co-rotating disks are described and compared with experimental data for the cases of (a) disk rotation in a fluid subject to solid-body rotation, (b) accelerating non-rotating radial flow, and (c) centrifugal swirling radial flow in a gap between parallel co-rotating disks. The present integral method demonstrates a higher accuracy at the expense of more accurate approximation of the radial velocity and temperature profiles in the boundary layer and provides also a good match of the simulations with known experimental data for rotation cavities. For negative or approximately constant radial distributions of the wall temperature, negative Nusselt numbers (wall heat flux direction opposite to that in the source region) can emerge in the area of the Ekman-type layers.

Keywords

Present Integral Method Nusselt Number Co-rotating Disks Cavity Rotation Swirl Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MBtech Group GmbH and Co. KGaA, Powertrain SolutionsFellbach-SchmidenGermany

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