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Mathematical Modeling of Convective Heat Transfer in Rotating-Disk Systems

  • Igor V. ShevchukEmail author
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Part of the Mathematical Engineering book series (MATHENGIN)

Abstract

This chapter, the general mathematical description is adapted for the rotating disk configurations. The chapter overviews in brief the existing mathematical methodology applicable to modelling the convective heat and mass transfer in such configurations, describes in detail the integral method developed by myself (referred to as “the present integral method” in this book) and gives a general analytical solution for turbulent boundary layer flow and heat transfer derived with the help of this method

Keywords

Heat Transfer Boundary Layer Nusselt Number Laminar Flow Integral Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MBtech Group GmbH and Co. KGaA, Powertrain SolutionsFellbach-SchmidenGermany

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