Advertisement

Inclusive Gaming Creation by Design in Formal Learning Environments: “Girly-Girls” User Group in No One Left Behind

  • María Eugenia Beltrán
  • Yolanda Ursa
  • Anja Petri
  • Christian Schindler
  • Wolfgang Slany
  • Bernadette Spieler
  • Silvia de los Rios
  • Maria Fernanda Cabrera-Umpierrez
  • Maria Teresa Arredondo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9187)

Abstract

The education sector in Europe is facing one of the toughest challenges on how to attract, motivate and engage students with content from an academic curriculum and at the same time supporting the formal learning process and providing a learning experience that matches the dynamics of the 21st century. More than ever, Albert Einstein’s words are a reality: “It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.” Using games in formal learning situations is an important topic of current research but is still largely underexplored. This paper presents how the “No One Left Behind” project aims at unlocking inclusive gaming creation and experiences, by and for students in day-to-day school life. It outlines the project’s use cases as well as explores cultural identity and gender inclusion when games framed in an educational environment are created by and for young girls (“girly-girls”).

Keywords

Pocket code Educational application STEM Empowerment of girls Gender inclusion Teenage girls Programming Mobile learning GPII DUXU 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has been partially funded by the EC H2020 Innovation Action No One Left Behind; http://www.no1leftbehind.eu/, Grant Agreement No. 645215

References

  1. 1.
    Boost Capital. Say Hello To Generation Z – Digital Natives, Entrepreneurs, The Staff and Customers Of Tomorrow, 17th October 2014. http://www.boostcapital.co.uk/blog/say-hello-generation-z-digital-natives-entrepreneurs-staff-customers-tomorrow/
  2. 2.
    Ron, D.: Child poverty and social exclusion: A framework for European action. In: library Briefing. Library of the European Parliament, 14th June 2013. http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/bibliotheque/briefing/2013/130537/LDM_BRI%282013%29130537_REV1_EN.pdf
  3. 3.
    Keeping kids in school. European Commission. Culture, education and youth, February 2011. http://ec.europa.eu/news/culture/110202_en.htm
  4. 4.
    The JRC report refers to Digital Games as a multitude of types and genres of games, played on different platforms using diverse digital technologies (i.e. computers, consoles, tablets, cell phones, etc.). Source: Kerr, Aphra. ‘The Business of Making Games’. In: Rutter, J., Bryce, J. (eds.) Understanding Digital Games. Sage Publications (2006)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    http://www.catrobat.org/. Accessed 23 April 2014
  6. 6.
    Kelleher, C., Pausch, R., Kiesler, S.: Storytelling alice motivates middle school girls to learn computer programming. In: Proceedings CHI 2007 (2007)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Eurydice and Eurostat. Key Data on Education in Europe 2012. http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/documents/key_data_series/134en.pdf
  8. 8.
    Fundación Secretariado General Gitano y del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores (2001); report on Gipsy children and youthGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Vanderheiden, G., Treviranus, J.: Creating a global public inclusive infrastructure. In: Stephanidis, C. (ed.) UAHCI 2011, Part I. LNCS, vol. 6765, pp. 517–526. Springer, Heidelberg (2011)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
    http://www.cips.ca/?q=webcasts. Accessed 23 April 2014
  12. 12.
    Zweben, S.: Ph.D. production at an all-time high, with more new graduates going abroad; Undergraduate enrollments again drop significantly. Comput. Res. News 18(3), 7–17 (2006)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kelleher, C., Pausch, R., Kiesler, S.: Storytelling alice motivates middle school girls to learn computer programming. In: Proceedings CHI 2007 (2007)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Jayanth, M.: 52 % of gamers are women – but the industry doesn’t know it. The Guradian, 18th September 2014. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/sep/18/52-percent-people-playing-games-women-industry-doesnt-know
  15. 15.
    Keith, S.: Game changers: the women who make video games. The Guradian, 11th December 2011. http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/dec/08/women-videogames-designing-writing
  16. 16.
    Boehner, K., DePaula, R., Dourish, P., Sengers, P.: Affect: From Information to Interaction. Critical computing Conference 2005, Århus, Denmark (2005). http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1094562.1094570
  17. 17.
    Catrobat: Pocket Code on Google Play for Education (2014). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75i10o_uv0U. Accessed 19 February 2015

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • María Eugenia Beltrán
    • 1
  • Yolanda Ursa
    • 1
  • Anja Petri
    • 2
  • Christian Schindler
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Slany
    • 2
  • Bernadette Spieler
    • 2
  • Silvia de los Rios
    • 3
  • Maria Fernanda Cabrera-Umpierrez
    • 3
  • Maria Teresa Arredondo
    • 3
  1. 1.INMARK Estudios y EstrategiasMadridSpain
  2. 2.Graz University of TechnologyGrazAustria
  3. 3.Life Supporting TechnologiesUniversidad Politecnica de MadridMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations