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Promoting Better Deaf/Hearing Communication Through an Improved Interaction Design for Fingerspelling Practice

  • Rosalee WolfeEmail author
  • John McDonald
  • Jorge Toro
  • Souad Baowidan
  • Robyn Moncrief
  • Jerry Schnepp
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9175)

Abstract

Fingerspelling is a manual system used by many signers for producing letters of a written alphabet to spell words from a spoken language. It can function as a link between signed and spoken languages. Fingerspelling is a vital skill for ASL/English interpreters, parents and teachers of deaf children as well as providers of deaf social services. Unfortunately fingerspelling reception can be a particularly difficult skill for hearing adults to acquire. One of the contributing factors to this situation is a lack of adequate technology to facilitate self-study. This paper describes new efforts to create a practice tool that more realistically simulates the use of fingerspelling in the real world.

Keywords

Deaf Deaf accessibility American sign language Fingerspelling Voice input 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalee Wolfe
    • 1
    Email author
  • John McDonald
    • 1
  • Jorge Toro
    • 2
  • Souad Baowidan
    • 1
  • Robyn Moncrief
    • 1
  • Jerry Schnepp
    • 3
  1. 1.DePaul UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Worchester Polytechnic InstituteWorchesterUSA
  3. 3.Bowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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