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Determining Anisotropic Myocardial Stiffness from Magnetic Resonance Elastography: A Simulation Study

  • Renee MillerEmail author
  • Haodan Jiang
  • Ria Mazumder
  • Brett R. Cowan
  • Martyn P. Nash
  • Arunark Kolipaka
  • Alistair A. Young
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9126)

Abstract

Although magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has the potential to non-invasively measure myocardial stiffness, myocardium is known to be anisotropic and it is not clear whether all material parameters can be uniquely determined from MRE data. In this study, we examined the determinability of anisotropic stiffness parameters using finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of harmonic steady state wave behavior. Two models were examined: (i) a cylindrical and (ii) a canine left ventricular geometry with realistic fiber architecture. A parameter sweep was carried out, and the objective function, which summed the error between reference displacements and displacements simulated from MRE boundary data and material parameters, was plotted and determinability assessed from the Hessian. Then, given prescribed boundary displacements from the ground truth simulation with added Gaussian noise, an anisotropic material parameter optimization was run 30 times with different noise in order to investigate the effect of noise on determination of material parameters. Results show that transversely isotropic material parameters can be robustly determined using this method.

Keywords

Magnetic resonance elastography Myocardial stiffness Cardiac anisotropy Finite element modelling 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by an award from the National Heart Foundation of New Zealand and by the NeSI high performance computing facilities.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renee Miller
    • 1
    Email author
  • Haodan Jiang
    • 2
  • Ria Mazumder
    • 3
  • Brett R. Cowan
    • 1
  • Martyn P. Nash
    • 4
    • 5
  • Arunark Kolipaka
    • 3
  • Alistair A. Young
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy with RadiologyUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Ohio Supercomputing CenterColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Auckland Bioengineering InstituteUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  5. 5.Department of Engineering ScienceUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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