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Contraception for Women with Medical Conditions

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Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Abstract

Pregnancy represents a higher risk state than the nonpregnant condition for all women, but especially for women with medical conditions. Any choice of contraceptive for a patient with a medical condition should include a weighing of the risks of that method with the risk of pregnancy. This chapter will outline resources for clinicians attempting to determine the best contraceptive method for women with medical conditions, specific behaviors, or attributes, including the Centers for Disease Control US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and Selected Practice Recommendations.

Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Medical eligibility criteria
  • Reproductive life planning
  • Medical condition

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Correspondence to Jennefer Russo MD, MPH .

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Russo, J., Nelson, A.L. (2016). Contraception for Women with Medical Conditions. In: Shoupe, D., Mishell, Jr., D. (eds) The Handbook of Contraception. Current Clinical Practice. Humana Press, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20185-6_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20185-6_3

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, Cham

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