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Choosing the Right Contraceptive

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Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Abstract

Healthcare providers must choose from the wide variety of options when addressing contraceptive needs of their patients. Most women are looking for a method that is effective and easy to use with few side effects. While oral contraceptive pills along with rings and patches have traditionally been the most popular methods in the United States, the highly effective long-acting reversible methods [LARC methods are the intrauterine devices and subdermal implants] are quickly gaining increased popularity and are now recommended as first-line options. The goal of the healthcare provider is to educate and aid in finding the right contraceptive method that the user will use consistently and correctly.

Keywords

  • Oral contraceptives
  • Contraceptive implants
  • Intrauterine devices
  • Progestion-only pills
  • Combination oral contraceptives
  • Injectable contraceptives
  • LARC methods
  • Noncontraceptive health benefits
  • Tubal ligation

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Correspondence to Donna Shoupe MD .

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Shoupe, D. (2016). Choosing the Right Contraceptive. In: Shoupe, D., Mishell, Jr., D. (eds) The Handbook of Contraception. Current Clinical Practice. Humana Press, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20185-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20185-6_2

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